FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE (FOP) STAR LODGE #20 BETHLEHEM, PA

P.O. BOX 1387 BETHLEHEM, PA 18016-1387

MISSION STATEMENT

The Fraternal Order of Police is the world's largest organization of sworn law enforcement officers, with more than 325,000 members in more than 2,100 lodges. FOP Star Lodge #20 is one of those 2,100 lodges whose purpose is to be the voice of those dedicated individuals that serve and have served the City of Bethlehem, PA. We are committed to improving the working conditions of those officers and the safety of the citizens of Bethlehem through education, information, community involvement and employee representation. Nobody knows the challenges, stressors and dangers faced by today's police officers better than another officer. It is the job of the FOP to be the voice for each of those officers.

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Associate Member Information

Associate Member Information

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Bethlehem Police Department

Bethlehem Police Department

Link to City of Bethlehem Website

FOP EXECUTIVE BOARD AND OFFICERS

2017-2019 EXECUTIVE BOARD AND LODGE OFFICERS
ABOUT THE FOP

old-fop-logo

In 1915, the life of a policeman was bleak. In many communities they were forced to work 12 hour days, 365 days a year. Police officers didn’t like it, but there was little they could do to change their working conditions. There were no organizations to make their voices heard; no other means to make their grievances known.

This soon changed, thanks to the courage and wisdom of two Pittsburgh patrol officers. Martin Toole and Delbert Nagle knew they must first organize police officers, like other labor interests, if they were to be successful in making life better for themselves and their fellow police officers. They and 21 others “who were willing to take a chance” met on May 14, 1915, and held the first meeting of the Fraternal Order of Police. They formed Fort Pitt Lodge #1. They decided on this name due to the anti-union sentiment of the time. However, there was no mistaking their intentions. As they told their city mayor, Joe Armstrong, the FOP would be the means “to bring our grievances before the Mayor or Council and have many things adjusted that we are unable to present in any other way…we could get many things through our legislature that our Council will not, or cannot give us.”

And so it began, a tradition of police officers representing police officers. The Fraternal Order of Police was given life by two dedicated police officers determined to better their profession and those who choose to protect and serve our communities, our states, and our country. It was not long afterward that Mayor Armstrong was congratulating the Fraternal Order of Police for their “strong influence in the legislatures in various states,…their considerate and charitable efforts” on behalf of the officers in need and for the FOP’s “efforts at increasing the public confidence toward the police to the benefit of the peace, as well as the public.”

From that small beginning the Fraternal Order of Police began growing steadily. In 1917, the idea of a National Organization of Police Officers came about. Today, the tradition that was first envisioned 90 years ago lives on with more than 2,100 local lodges and more than 325,000 members in the United States. The Fraternal Order of Police has become the largest professional police organization in the country. The FOP continues to grow because we have been true to the tradition and continued to build on it. The Fraternal Order of Police are proud professionals working on behalf of law enforcement officers from all ranks and levels of government.

The emblem adopted by the National Fraternal Order of Police is designed to remind the membership of the duties that are expected of them as a citizen, a police officer and a member of the lodge. The five-cornered star tends to remind us of the allegiance we owe to our Flag and is a symbol of the authority with which we are entrusted. It is an honor the people we serve bestow upon us. They place their confidence and trust in us; serve them proudly. Midway between the points and center of the star is a blue field representative of the thin blue line protecting those we serve.

The points are of gold, which indicates the position under which we are now serving. The background is white, the unstained color representing the purity with which we should serve. We shall not let anything corrupt be injected into our order. Therefore, our colors are blue, gold and white.

The open eye is the eye of vigilance ever looking for danger and protecting all those under its care while they sleep or while awake. The clasped hands denote friendship. The hand of friendship is always extended to those in need of our comfort.

The circle surrounding the star midway indicates our never ending efforts to promote the welfare and advancement of this order. Within the half circle over the centerpiece is our motto, “Jus, Fides, Libertatum” which translated means, “Law is a Safeguard of Freedom.”

The FOP star logo, the FOP scroll logo, the name “Fraternal Order of Police” and the name “FOP” are registered trademarks of the Grand Lodge Fraternal Order of Police. The use or reproduction of the FOP name or logo is forbidden without the express written consent of the Grand Lodge Fraternal Order of Police.

 

IN MEMORIAM

OFFICERS WHO HAVE MADE THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE
On August 26th, 1907, Officer Shuman was shot to death while affecting an arrest of a William Handy in the area of the Reading Railway near Adams St. Several hours later Handy was arrested. On September 23rd, 1907, he was sentenced to death for the murder of Officer Shuman and on February 20th, 1908, he was electrocuted. Officer Shuman was a member of the South Bethlehem Borough Police Department. Ten years later the Boroughs of South Bethlehem and Bethlehem merged to become the City Of Bethlehem.
Officer George Shuman August 26th, 1907

Officer George Shuman August 26th, 1907

On January 6th, 1924, Officer Lawrence responded to the scene of a structure fire in the unit block of W. Broad St. Officer Lawrence had climbed a ladder to assist in fighting the fire when he fell from the ladder. He suffered a head injury and died a short time later at St. Luke's Hospital
Officer Charles Lawrence January 6th, 1924

Officer Charles Lawrence January 6th, 1924

On November 12th, 1927, Officer Fenton while walking his patrol beat interrupted a robbery at a “disorderly house” at 228 Columbia St. and as he was attempting to arrest several actors he was shot by one of them. Officer Fenton died from his injuries on November 14th, 1927. Several individuals were later arrested in Cleveland, Oh. for the murder of Officer Fenton.
Officer Charles Fenton November 14th, 1927

Officer Charles Fenton November 14th, 1927

On June 3rd, 1932, Captain Strauss was directing traffic on William Penn Highway during a barn fire, when he was struck and killed by an automobile.
Captain Harry Strauss June 3rd, 1932

Captain Harry Strauss June 3rd, 1932

On August 29th, 1969, Officer Fahy and his partner Officer Merle Getz were on patrol when they attempted to stop a vehicle driven by a Bebley Wells. After pursuing the vehicle to an area off the Williams St. Ext. Wells exited his vehicle and immediately fired a shotgun at Officer Fahy mortally wounding him. Officer Getz was able to return fire striking Wells several times. Wells was later tried and convicted for the murder of Officer Fahy and and died serving a life term for 1st degree murder in the Pennsylvania State Prison System in 2004. A bridge that spans the Lehigh River was named the Phillip J. Fahy Memorial Bridge in Officer Fahy’s honor.
Officer Phillip J. Fahy August 29th, 1969

Officer Phillip J. Fahy August 29th, 1969

On April 25th, 1997, Officer Rice a 26-year veteran of the force was on patrol when he was involved in a motor vehicle accident at the intersection of Schoenersville Rd. and Westgate Dr. Officer Rice died from injuries that he suffered in the accident. The local chapter of the Ancient Order Of Hibernians “The Danny Rice Division” is named in his honor. The City of Bethlehem also honored him by dedicating a local park in his name.
Officer Daniel E. Rice - April 25th, 1997

Officer Daniel E. Rice - April 25th, 1997

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